Archive | November, 2012

O’Quirey

25 Nov

Dutch design Portugeuse craftsmenship.
Koen Naber, een jonge ondernemer die zijn flagship store opent. ALle tegenslagen, tijd, corruptie/vrienden diensten, extra tolheffingen, vertraging, onduidelijke vooraf onbekende kostenposten ten spijt heeft hij het gehaald > WINKEL OPEN!
Hij heeft investeerder gevonden, container schoenen handgemaakt in Portugal, unique design, winkelpersoneel getraind, zwaar in het rood maar hollandse ondernemers geest > respect voor KOEN! (more details to come!)
Op naar 200+ winkels. De openening door de ambasadeurs van Nederland (links) Portugal (2e van links), Koen en de designer (rechts).

Ik heb ORANJE paar gekocht en de meinui’s (schoonheden) waren er ter promotie, drankjes en snapshots, super hapjes, Heineken en portugese wijnen.

The ME generation

24 Nov

Everyone born after 1979 is most likely only child in the family, 2 parents 4 grandparents.70% of disposable family income is spend on him/her. They take for granted the undivided attention of their parents and grandparents. Before, the Chinese society was built on a collectivist thinking and focusing on We, but the younger generations are more individualists and focus on themselves. The middle class singleton children are expected to get a university degree and to succeed in their studies. The studies involve studying and visiting abroad. In top universities the atmosphere is highly competitive, and suicide after failure is not unheard of. Chinese bachelors are having difficulty in finding a wife. The educated bachelorettes are very demanding, want to have a career and may prefer a foreign husband. Male beauty pageants, cosmetic surgery, and match-making services thrive.
On CHINESE BUSINESS GROUP I posted  in my job these people are highly motivated but have difficulty doing teamwork, they rather slice all work in individual chuncks and distribute it, any thoughts how to improve?
GREAT REPLY  Differences with regard to working in a team may have to do with traditional Chinese management culture, which has been very authoritative, and not very team-work oriented. People are held strictly responsible for their mistakes, and mistakes in general have not been accepted. Therefore, people might not like to work in a team where they may be held accountable for someone else’s mistakes.

Regarding taking advice and asking for help, it may have to do with the very different concept of saving face in the Chinese culture. The Chinese may feel embarrassed (rather than over-confident) with regards to needing help. That is why they “rather slice all work in individual chuncks” as Max has noticed, so that they are fully aware of their task and responsibility.

Laowai – Gangnam

20 Nov

Beijing parodie op GANGNAM style. Familie Teunissen heeft veel plezier met dit filmpje!


Ta ke shi Laowai style, Laowai La le!!!

Luuk en zijn vrienden kunnen het al mee zingen!

Begrijpende woordenlijst voor de Laowai:

Laowai = vreemdeling
Yanling = Beijing pils (3% dus waterig)
Tsighua = universiteit
3rd ring North = beton beton en beton
Weibo = Chinese twitter
Wang Laoji = Chinese red bull

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Bikes, bikes, bikes!

18 Nov

We have more than 10 bikes in Beijing, one has become famous

Bikes, bikes, bikes!

De chinezen maken zich erg zorgen over het fietsenoverschot in Nederland. Het haalt zelfs de krant!

Dutch cycling hits the brakes as bicycle numbers pile up

chinadaily.com.cn (10 november 2012 09:49)

Problems familiar to car drivers the world over, from traffic jams to road-rage and lack of parking, are now also threatening to turn the Dutch dream of bicycling bliss into a daily hell.

In a small country where bicycles outnumber people by 1.2 million, the Dutch have simply run out of space to accommodate the 5 million cyclists who take to the road every day, turning commuting in major cities into a nightmare.

In Amsterdam alone, 490,000 cyclists take to the road to travel a staggering 2 million kilometers every day, according to statistics released by the city council this week.

“Bicycles are an integral mode of transport in our city,” Amsterdam’s council said. But, in a worrying trend, “the busiest bicycle paths are too small for the growing stream of daily cyclists”.

“Cyclists have increased dramatically over the last few years,” said Wim Bot of the Dutch Cycling Association (Fietsersbond).

“In a small country such as the Netherlands, where almost every square meter is accounted for, we’ve run out of space,” said Bot, whose association was founded in 1975 and currently represents 35,000 paid members. “It has become a headache,” he told AFP.

The Dutch first fell in love with cycling in the late 1880s, when the first two-wheeled contraptions appeared in big cities. Two decades later the first bicycle paths were laid in the country, which is so flat that it is often described as “specially created for cyclists”.

After a slump in cycling – occupying Nazis melted down confiscated bicycles to feed the war effort – and a brief love affair with cars following World War II, cycling regained its popularity by the mid-1970s.

Today, there are around 18 million bicycles – or 1.3 bicycles per citizen old enough to ride – in a country less than half the size of the US state of Maine. Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte is often seen cycling to work.

New bicycle sales topped 1.3 million last year, raking in an estimated 970 million euros ($1.2 billion) in sales.

Some 35,000 kilometers of bike path now criss-cross the flat landscape. The red tarmac roads are purpose built, regularly maintained and come with their own set of road signs and traffic lights.

But having invested heavily in bicycle infrastructure, the Dutch are now paying the price for cycling’s rise in popularity.

The Dutch newspaper Trouw recently said that in places such as Amsterdam and Utrecht, the increase in bicycles is giving rise to new phenomena that include bicycle traffic jams, pileups, parking problems and bicycle rage.

Around major stations such as Amsterdam and Utrecht Central, tens of thousands of bicycles are often illegally parked, hog public space and restrict pedestrian access, while leaving cyclists scratching their heads trying to remember where they parked.

More cyclists on the road means more congestion, and “bicycle rage” often flies across the handlebars.

“Sometimes its a madhouse out there,” said Jan van der Tuin, a bicycle shed parking attendant just outside Utrecht’s busy central station.

“There’s been no fist-fights, but harsh words are often spoken,” he said with a sigh as he took a drag from his hand-rolled cigarette.

“We have big problems,” agreed Marleen van der Wurff, as she frantically looked for a bicycle parking spot in Utrecht before having to run for a train.

“It’s plainly becoming a dangerous situation,” said Wurff, who relies completely on her bicycle to get around the city.

The statistics show just how dangerous it has become. A quarter of all deadly accidents in the Netherlands involve cyclists, the Cycling Association said.

Some 200 cyclists died on Dutch roads last year, the majority of them elderly, the Dutch central statistics office said, an increase of 28 from 2010.

And the problem is getting worse since the Dutch authorities decided to broaden bicycle path use to include more than 1 million mopeds, which are allowed to pass cyclists as long as they stay under a speed limit of 25 km per hour.

You can bycicle in the forbidden city, first court, HEAVEN for a DUTCHMAN in BEIJING
The pic below is in front of Forbidden City:

Lunch

17 Nov

Heerlijk lunchen, 2 soorten miántiao (noodles), mifan (rijst), yi rou (kip), piejiu (beer), ….

MNC’s in China

15 Nov

Adoption to the Chinese market
– You need your best people and the ones making the decisions on the ground
– Not only expats but build strong local management
– Spend time here to learn the dynamics

Let your head of China report to directly to the CEO
– China report into APJ or direct to your CEO?
– Shorten reporting lines improves responsiveness
– Get China on the your leadership team

Ask yourself:
– Are the local functions in China as strong as they are at home?
– Design growth strategies, develop a deeper customer understanding of customers, brands and retail local talent
– So build your local corporate functions!
– And ask yourself do you take a coordinated approach on China?
– Do you make a separate emerging market team or make it cross functional?
– Do you adapt your entire operating model to stress the importance of relationship and the role of government?
– Are you shifting investment dollars?

happy reading

Parkview Green

13 Nov

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Alsof we nog niet genoeg shopping-malls hebben in Beijing…weer een nieuwe, om de hoek deze keer.

En hoera, Illy, je kent ze wel van de lekkere koffie, heeft deze lokatie gekozen voor hun jaarlijkse Galleria Art event. Het staat bommetje vol geweldige kunstwerken. Weer een adresje voor een rainy (or smoggy) day.

Het overgrote deel van de aanwezige kunst blijkt privé bezit te zijn van de eigenaar van de mall, als je een rijke chinees treft, dan zijn ze ook meestal heeeeeeel rijk, een Dali-tje meer of minder…